When you go in …

When you go in there, remember who the real enemy is.
– Haymitch Abernathy, The Hunger Games: Catching Fire

A critical review of the sequel “Catching Fire” in The Hunger Games Trilogy.

Brutally honest here, the reviewers of the book readers saying that the sequel was better than the first, still holding on to that edge-of-your-seat anticipation is no laughing matter. Last night, I went on a Christmastime date to see Catching Fire, adapted from the second book of Suzanne Collins. All in all, my review is truly incredible: 5 stars.

The sequel movie featuring Josh Hutcherson [Peeta Mellark], Jennifer Lawrence [Katniss Everdeen], Woody Harrelson [Haymitch Abernathy, quoted], and Elizabeth Banks [Effie Trinket]was phenomenal: more flowing and corresponding to the book–with some actual literary dialogue–surely made it gripping to all Tributors out there. The story line was absolutely perfect! 🙂 ^_^

Knowing the books as well as I do, the reactions of the other districts were spot on: riotous and passionate. Finnick Odair [Sam Claflin] was captured delightfully in the Hollywood interpretation of one of the best novel series known. Truly the sequencing feature was just as captivating as the first, what with Johanna Mason as a loud-and-foul-mouthed firecracker angry at the government, Finnick as an on-screen player, Beetee and Wiress (Nuts and Volts inversely) as strangely capable thinkers, Mags as a wonderful lady, and the Careers as pompous as ever. All of the characters had brilliant portrayals and excellent translations.

Now, I must admit to you my review of the first movie, as it coincides with this secondary review.

The first interpretation of the novels was adequate at best, and I say this with utmost respect for the books, due to the lacking quality of a few major happenings from the novel that I shall enumerate here:

  1. The admiration of Peeta: I know that not many people like to endure blood and gore, but that is simply what the Hunger Games represent in their post-apocalyptic scenario. Peeta [Hutcherson] was injured by Career Tribute Cato [Alexander Ludwig] in an attempt of survival during the Games. The slash in his leg was not nearly fatal enough in the movie (I don’t know if it was because they couldn’t use enough special effects makeup in order to produce such a massive wound properly, or what the case would’ve been) and that severely bothers me to this day. Secondly on this matter IT DOESN’T HEAL. Strictly and vividly remembering the crucial details of the first book, Peeta’s leg wound gets bad enough to where he is in need of amputation and leg replacement, leading me to my next point:
  2. Intensity of the Love: Katniss and Peeta win the Games together due to her nightlock scheme, no matter how last minute it was. Peeta’s injury was already too deep to heal at any rate with his survival, so the Capitol had to resort to replacement in order to maintain their image and to keep the winners for the Victory Tour; in relation, as the medics were taking Peeta off on a gurney to operate, Katniss was so attached that she followed them, banging on the glass door screaming his name frantically in hopes of him not dying to the blood poisoning in his system to the point sh has to be sedated because she wouldn’t respond to reason. The editor(s), I hope, left that scene out of the picture for whatever reason. It’s the scene that keeps you wanting more: will he live, will he die? But no, they end it with them winning.
  3. Appearances make the matters: This doesn’t so much bother me now as it did when I first saw the movie. Haymitch, according to Collins, has curly black hair and blue eyes, but I must admit that Harrelson was perfect for the role, seeing as Haymitch is alike to the comedy relief of the serious spectrum of the Games. And also, Gale. Well played, but not attractive enough in my opinion (others can argue with me if they wish to do so but I will not reply and shall stand my ground on the matter.)

 

Overall the two together get 4.5 out of 5, so Kudos, Bravo, and a Job Well Done.

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